Written Description in the Life Sciences: The Devil is in the Details

June 8, 2021

There is a quid pro quo under the U.S. patent laws. In exchange for disclosing her invention, an inventor receives a limited monopoly. Recent developments, however, have made it harder for those in the biotechnology industry to obtain the benefit of this bargain. The written description requirement mandates that a patent specification convey to one of skill in the art that the inventors had possession of their invention as of the day they filed their patent application. Ariad Pharms., Inc. v. Eli Lilly & Co., 598 F.3d 1336, 1351 (Fed. Cir. 2010). Over the last decade, three areas have proven troublesome in the life sciences. This article will examine those three areas. 

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Sharon E. Roberg-Perez, Ph.D.

Partner

Co-Chair, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee

William R. Jones

Associate

Pronouns: he/him

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