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Consent Decree to Reform Chicago Police Department Receives Approval

Robins Kaplan LLP announced today the approval of a consent decree that will require wide-ranging and enforceable reforms of the Chicago Police Department (CPD). The consent decree is the result of a lawsuit brought by the Illinois Attorney General’s Office and Robins Kaplan against the City of Chicago, a suit which sought to implement reforms to CPD practices that were recommended by the U.S. Department of Justice following its civil rights investigation of the CPD. Robins Kaplan attorneys have represented the State of Illinois on a pro bono basis since the suit was filed in August 2017.

Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul lauded the approval of the federal consent decree, which will require wide-ranging and enforceable reforms of the Chicago Police Department (CPD). Approved by U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Dow, the decree comes after a year of negotiations by the Attorney General’s Office, the City of Chicago and CPD, as well as engagement with Chicago communities, organizations, and police officers.

The consent decree mandates reforms of the CPD’s policies, practices, training, and accountability mechanisms to address the use of force, ensure police accountability, improve public and officer safety, and ultimately, build trust between CPD and Chicago residents. For more information, please see the official news release published by the Illinois Attorney General’s Office or view the order on the consent decree.